5 x 5 - Get to Know a Service Designer, Diane Seaver

Interview with Diane Seaver, Philips Design

by Thomas Brandenburg

My peers say I'm an excellent "Marriage Counselor" because of my ability to pull stakeholders with competing priorities/goals into a room and have them agree on how to move forward.

What issue related to service design thought leadership is most interesting to you?

Business tools and change management. A great experience can only be delivered is the service provider has the (internal) tools or systems it needs to do so and if the people who are the ones providing that service adopt new ways of working.

 

What skill(s) should a budding service designer have in his or her back pocket? 

Future casting and trend research - if you know where an industry is coming from, and can see where an industry is going, and know how to leverage trends to get there, you'll be invaluable to business

 

What reading material (articles, books, blogs, etc) would you recommend reading?

Wired (great way to keep a pulse on a variety of mainstream topics)

Sci-fi, particularly Neil Stephenson (best way to think about 'what the future might look like')

O'Reilly Media (books, podcast, articles, again on many subjects including design)

Convivial Toolbox (just about everything you do should at some point include cocreation)

Business Management books (what KPIs do your business partners care about, what language are they using that you need to speak, how do they think about success)

 

How would you describe your work style?

Thorough and methodical - pros: covering your bases, building a depth of knowledge, and confidence in decisions made || cons: overwhelming amounts of information, slower progress to final result, you're never done.

 

What is the best piece of advice you ever received?

Be a team player - rather than worry about being right, or achieving a certain quality benchmark, first focus on doing what helps the team, and being able to do what you want will follow. People are more likely to speak highly of you to others if they think they are more successful with you around.

 

Bonus question, “What is your best ninja skill?”

My peers say I'm an excellent "Marriage Counselor" because of my ability to pull stakeholders with competing priorities/goals into a room and have them agree on how to move forward.